Posts tagged Painting
8:43 pm - Mon, Feb 11, 2013
63,666 notes
arpeggia:

James Nares - I Can Tell, 2010, iridescent pigment and wax on linen, 94” x 67 1/4” | More posts

arpeggia:

James Nares - I Can Tell, 2010, iridescent pigment and wax on linen, 94” x 67 1/4” | More posts

Filed under: Painting

2:45 pm - Tue, May 29, 2012
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The Unspeakable - oil on canvas 70 x 95 cm | 2009-2010
by Agnes Toth
The Unspeakable - oil on canvas 70 x 95 cm | 2009-2010

by Agnes Toth

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Filed under: Painting

2:00 am - Sat, May 12, 2012
7,248 notes
artforadults:

submission from bianca morelos, follow Bianca
—————————————————-
Bianca Morelos
Tumblr: http://aerobicsalmon.tumblr.com/
Behance: http://www.behance.net/biancamorelos

artforadults:

submission from bianca morelos, follow Bianca

—————————————————-

Bianca Morelos

Tumblr: http://aerobicsalmon.tumblr.com/

Behance: http://www.behance.net/biancamorelos

Filed under: Painting submission

1:12 am - Fri, May 11, 2012
38,706 notes

Artist Riusuke Fukahori

Artist Riusuke Fukahori

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Filed under: Riusuke Fukahori Painting

3:16 am - Mon, Apr 2, 2012
11,433 notes

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Filed under: Painting

12:34 am - Sat, Mar 31, 2012
12,230 notes

lacarpa:

Duality of the Mind - Part One and

Part Two

by

Melissa Hartley

http://melissajhartley.tumblr.com/

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Filed under: Painting

11:26 pm - Sat, Mar 3, 2012
37 notes

bitemagazine:

FEATURE | ROBERT KNOKE

German-born, New York-based artist Robert Knoke is revered internationally for his atmospheric portraits that immortalise some of today’s cultural visionaries, from designers Rick Owens and Gareth Pugh to musicians Patti Smith and The Kills. BITE Magazine’s Fashion Editor, Deak Rostochil, discussed abstractions, destructions and inspirations with this multifaceted artist in Issue 03.

So Robert, tell me a bit about yourself. What brought you into the art world? Stupidity? (laughs) Well, my father was an artist and I grew up being at his studio all the time, looking at his work and trying to do what he was doing. When I got older, I realized that I had continued doing the same thing. So after my sixteenth birthday or so, I told myself that art is what I want to do for the rest of my life, no matter if I make a living off of it or not. That’s it. Well, that’s what I feel about art… the art world is a different story.

How would you describe your drawings? What artistic genre do you fit into, if any? Technically my work is in-between drawing and painting and it’s about portraiture of course, although my work is not only about portraiture. I actually don’t know the genre. Because my drawing style looks fast in its gesture, some people say my work is expressionistic, but I’m certainly not an expressionist. I’m very much interested in the abstractions that surround or destroy the people I’m drawing. I think it’s a mix of all kinds of things that you can do on paper.

And what draws you to those people to want to produce their portrait? How do you choose your subjects? When I first started the series, I thought about what kind of people I wanted to draw. I didn’t want to draw family members or close friends because it made me feel uncomfortable. I don’t like to draw people that I’ve known for a very long time, but I also didn’t want to draw a stranger that I have nothing in common with. That’s the reason why I choose people mostly from cultural fields – other artists, musicians, writers and designers that I like very much. The series is a documentation of people I love and at the same time a sort of a self-portrait.

Text: Deak Rostochil

Full interview in BITE Magazine Issue 03/Navigate. 
Available to read & purchase online now.


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Filed under: Painting

2:08 am - Sat, Jan 28, 2012
240 notes

hifructosemag:

Chloe Early

(Source: kamoki, via peep-toe-shoes)

Filed under: Painting

11:31 am - Wed, Jan 25, 2012
125 notes

bitemagazine:

FEATURED ARTIST | DANIEL LUMBINI

The 33 year old London based artist incorporates an extensive range of mediums in his art with complete dexterity. Daniel Lumbini’s focus on portraits reveals a penchant for all things “big, bad and ugly…”

When did you first discover your personal style with regard to art? I’ve been collaging and painting since I was about 16. It was pure coincidence that I revisited these mediums many years later and combined them.

What do you do in your free time? I don’t get much free time, and when I do I’m usually messing with some kind of artwork; I’m also a keen collector so am researching a lot and am involved with curating shows as well. Time spent away from art is usually hanging out with my daughter, going to museums, watching sports - I love MMA so if I had any quality free time I would probably take up fighting again.

You’ve carried out several exhibitions before, which is the most memorable to you? Probably the In/Human show as it was my first decent show which I also helped to curate; it was significant because it was the first exhibition where I got to show alongside some guys I really admired.

What are some of your favourite mediums to work with? I like a bit of everything - I mix screens, acrylics, collage, lots of solvent and different resins but my favourite is traditional oil paints. Purely because they’re so pliable yet so difficult to get right….

There exists a combination of collage and oil in your work. Could you share with us the artistic processes behind them? The collage was originally a way for me to plan my pieces, enabling me to distort pictures and create a unique composition. I suffer from limited patience and destroy more works than I finish, but sometimes the final piece missing from a painting is just something so simple. I  working on a painting but just couldn’t get the last bit to work, so had an idea to rip a piece from a magazine to see how this particular mouth would work instead. The contrast between printed piece and scruffy paint worked so well I just kept going with it, although I have since started messing with many other foreign things, introducing them into my paintings like sim cards and bubblegum. 

Did you start out with the intention to convey messages/emotions through your art? I’ve always been more interested in the puzzle art presents, more so than conveying any message - I’m not interested in being clever or political, although I guess all artists want to make something thought-provoking, but I never set out with any agenda - I just want to create something that surprises or that’s never been seen before, which is virtually impossible nowdays …

The “distortion” of portraits is a recurring feature of your art, could you share with us why this is so? As with the use of collage in my work, I just like it when things look odd, ugly, quirky, or slightly wrong. I guess I’ve just always been more intrigued by unorthodox things - it’s these anomalies that pioneer things, and I guess that’s what I’d like to do. I also find it quite pointless when paintings look just like the subject - creating art gives you artistic license, which is an amazing thing and an artist should always strive to make something unique and inspiringly different. 

Which piece means the most to you? I’m never sentimental about work. I have certain pieces where I feel I’ve made a breakthrough, like Son of Siam, but I always think I can do something better next time… 

Who are some of your favourite artists? Right now am loving Dana Schutz, Ahmed Alsoudani, Dan Colen and Jenny Saville - anyone who can do big, bad and ugly. 

What inspires you? Knowing there are amazing painters like this out there who are my age and who have achieved so much, and I haven’t. Yet.

What’s next for Daniel Lumbini? I have a busy year ahead, with a big show in March at Rook & Raven, where I’ll be creating renditions and reworking images from the renowned photographer Terry O’neill, alongside some really great young artists like Dalek, Curtis Kulig, Pam Glew and James Dawe - am very excited to be part of such a great lineup. Then I have a big joint show alongside a friend and painter who I very much admire, later in the year, but can’t give too much away until it’s fully confirmed. 

More of Daniel’s work can be found here/here.

Text: Nadirah Nazaraly
Images: © Daniel Lumbini


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Filed under: Painting

12:36 am - Fri, Jan 6, 2012
56 notes
sequin:

Color chart for my watercolors (by {JooJoo})

sequin:

Color chart for my watercolors (by {JooJoo})

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Filed under: Painting Watercolour

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